Crater lake Víti.

I was fortunate to find myself in the northern Highlands of Iceland near Mývatn for the first dusting of snow this season. The crater lake Víti (meaning ‘hell’ in Icelandic) is part of the volcanically active Krafla caldera.

The panorama below was stitched from three frames obtained via the ‘Shift’ movement on Canon’s Tilt-Shift 17mm f/4 lens.

Víti crater at Krafla, first dusting of snow

Sensuous
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
Panorama of Víti crater at Krafla, first dusting of snow, Iceland

Víti í Kröflu panorama (Click on the image to enlarge)
5D Mark III, TS-E 17L

 
 
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Mjóifjörður, Iceland. Population: 20.

I had barely settled down in my cottage after a long day when I espied the little girl leading her horse. Sensing the unfolding situation, I reached for my camera and dashed out barefoot in the cold, damp conditions.

Jónina París Guðmundsdóttir on her horse in Mjóifjörður

Icelandic girl, Icelandic Horse
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Jónina París Guðmundsdóttir on her horse in Mjóifjörður

Girl, Horse, Fjord
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Jónina París Guðmundsdóttir of Mjóifjörður

Jónina París Guðmundsdóttir of Mjóifjörður, East Iceland
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
 
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  • Arun - November 16, 2014 - 8:38 pm

    #1 is a favorite.

    The 24-105 is extremely versatile. I wonder if the 24-70 f2.8 v2 provides anything over it.ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - November 17, 2014 - 5:51 pm

      Yes, the 24-105L, while not the sharpest arrow in the quiver (especially the corners), is the most versatile lens around. I have briefly tried the 24-70 f/2.8 II. Its image quality is stellar but its lack of IS and the extra 71-105 range dictated my decision to stay with the 24-105.

Night of the demon.

Recycling the introduction from an earlier post –

The Hindu festival of Diwali (Deepavali) has multiple interpretations, all having their basis in the triumph of virtue over vice.

One version tells of the vile Narkasur, embodiment of the forces of darkness (tamas), ignorance (avidya) and baseness (adharma). The puranas recount his comeuppance at the hands of Krishna who deployed the sudarshan-chakra (discus) to behead the fiend. Narkasur‘s vanquishment lead to the restoration of dharma, and the Diwali celebrations represent a renewal of the memory of Krishna‘s triumphal moment.

In Goa is prevalent the quaint practice – perhaps unique in India – of the reenactment of the Narkasur mythos. On the eve of Diwali, effigies of Narkasur are mounted at village squares and towns. After a night of boisterous revelry, they are consigned to flames at dawn.

 

These photos were taken last month on October 21, 2014, the eve of Diwali. I have also put together a short video below that captures some of the sights and sounds of the revelry.

All my posts on this theme are consolidated here.

Narkasur in Mala, Panjim

Narkasur in Mala, Panjim

In Mala, Panjim
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Britona (Bittona)

Man-eater in Britona
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur near Mahalaxmi Temple in Panjim (Keni's Narkasur)

In Panjim
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur near Altinho slope in St Inez, Panjim

In St. Inez, Panjim
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Mala, Panjim

In Mala, Panjim
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Britona (Bittona)

In Britona
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur and Krishna in Ekoshi

Krishna confronts Narkasur, in Ekoshi
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Thivim

In Thivim
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 

Narkasur in Chimbel

Narkasur in Chimbel

In Chimbel
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Pomburpa

In Pomburpa
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Mala, Panjim

In Mala, Panjim
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Traditional Narkasur in Chimbel

Traditional Narkasur in Chimbel
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Narkasur in Chorão

In Chorão
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 


Music credit: Raga Shankara by Bismillah Khan.

 
 
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  • Sanjeev - November 17, 2014 - 9:38 pm

    Congratulations on compiling the best collection of Narkasura photographs !! – ever.

    Another invaluable documentation of a Goan heritage.ReplyCancel

  • Arun - November 14, 2014 - 5:51 am

    How long does it take to build a Narkasura?

    Great shots!ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - November 14, 2014 - 8:39 am

      I would say, 5 days or so. The facemask is usually sourced from local artists for whom this is a good opportunity to bring in some extra income.

Village life in Goa.

These coveys at Goan village intersections late in the evenings are a familiar sight.

Late evening in Betki, Goa

Octet - Betki, Goa

Octet – in Betki, Goa
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Women of colour, Priol, Goa

Women of colour – in Priol, Goa
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
 
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  • Con - November 7, 2014 - 8:56 pm

    Rajan Bab,

    As usual fantastic photography of life in our beautiful Goa.

    The greenery resembles the ‘garden of Eden’

    ConReplyCancel

  • Priyaranjan Anand Marathe - November 7, 2014 - 9:26 am

    I think the ladies are waiting for bus. I miss this mode of transport. In Goa where it doesn’t get so crowded it was fun to ride on a bus. Especially the journey to college from Panaji to Ponda. Great photos as always! And enjoy your stay!ReplyCancel

Dwindling open spaces.

As a rule, I keep this blog free of politics. This post is an exception.

Not long go, the benisons of Goa were its wide open spaces, unspoilt hills, forests, tranquil rivers, and virgin beaches. The beaches were the first to be laid low. Then they went for its open spaces, its wild hills and its forests. The relentless march of concretization is on (pure Third World in design and quality) and the situation has gotten to be dire now.

When Manohar Parrikar was returned as Chief Minister in 2012, there was much joy and Goans nursed great hope that he would stem the tide and preserve what was left of Goa. Alas, that hope has turned out to be false. His administration is as venal as the one that preceded it. Clearly, an IIT education does not imbue one with wisdom. Apropos of the sorry Manohar Parrikar, Einstein’s quip comes to mind: the man can calculate but he cannot think.

Bai in Batim, Goa

Goa’s dwindling spaces: My niece Saraswati in Batim, Goa
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Babu and Bai in Batim, Goa

My nephew Yash and niece Saraswati in Batim, Goa
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
 
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