Filigree in sand.

Recently I took a special flight over the southern Highlands of Iceland in a Cessna 207 equipped with open windows. I got very lucky with the conditions: diffused light of the high clouds interspersed with glancing sun beams. It will take me some time to sort through the photo shoot. For now, a few teasers.

Patterns of glacial river Tungnaá

Patterns of glacial river Tungnaá

Patterns, glacial river Tungnaá
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
Glacial river valley, southern Highlands

Glacial river valley, southern Highlands
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
 
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  • Raji - October 10, 2014 - 10:17 pm

    These are beautiful! Looking forward to more.ReplyCancel

  • Nachiketa Yakkundi - October 10, 2014 - 12:19 pm

    Just unreal, Rajan! If this is a teaser then I cannot wait for the feature presentation.ReplyCancel

  • Premanand - October 6, 2014 - 8:01 pm

    Are the first two images processed using the Simplify plugin (Horseplay)? And what is it, clouds or river or smoke?ReplyCancel

RGB colours.

Encountered these hikers today morning near the beautiful mountain Hvítserkur on the route to Loðmundarfjörður in Iceland.

French hikers near Hvítserkur, East Iceland

Hikers near Hvítserkur, East Iceland
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
A friendly trio from France

A friendly trio from France
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
 
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Salutations to the Portly One and Festival Greetings to all!

The festival of Ganesha will be celebrated on Friday, August 29.

Ganesha

Ganesha
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
Excerpts from my introduction to the Ganesha photo gallery in The Huffington Post, 2010:

The story is told that the elephant-headed Ganesha and his brother Kartikeya, the god of war, were once locked in a dispute. To break the impasse they sought the counsel of their parents, the great God Shiva and Goddess Parvati. Lord Shiva proposed that the boys compete in a race of 3 laps around the universe. Kartikeya mounted his peacock and dashed out of sight, hoping to open up an early lead. Ganesha, on the other hand, was in no hurry. He walked over to Shiva and Parvati, went around them thrice and bowed, saying, “You, my dear parents, are the manifest universe. I have completed the race.”

This parable illuminates Ganesha’s character – loving, highly intelligent; a fount of wisdom. Immensely loved in India, he is acknowledged as a scholar nonpareil, music runs in his blood, and as his portly figure suggests, he is a confirmed foodie. It was Ganesha who transcribed the great Hindu epic Mahabharata in real time while the sage Vyasa dictated it.

Ties to Ganesha run deep in Hindu families where he is often viewed as a member of the household. He is invoked at the beginning of every new undertaking and his blessings sought at major events in life. Generations of students given to goofing off have been known to petition him for a lifeline just before writing their final exam.

The festival of Ganesha Chaturthi is celebrated every year, and the festivities in western and southern India are especially intense.

 
 

My earlier posts on the Ganesha theme are at this link.

 
 
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  • andrea - September 26, 2014 - 11:06 am

    that is a nice pic of lord GaneshaReplyCancel

  • vnm - August 31, 2014 - 2:53 am

    सरागलोकदुर्लभं विरागिलोकपूजितं
    सुरासुरैर्नमस्कृतं जरापमृत्युनाशकम् ।
    गिरागुरुं श्रियाहरिं जयन्ति यत्पदार्चिकाः
    नमामि तं गणाधिपं कृपापयःपयोनिधिम् ।।ReplyCancel