Prehistoric Rock Art Gallery in Goa

The tiny settlement of Usgalimol (also referred to as Pansaimol) near the village of Rivona in Sanguem taluka in south Goa is host to an extraordinary site – a gallery of petroglyphs inscribed on a bed of laterite. The objects set in stone include human and animal forms, symbols, and implements. The area of interest covers approximately 60 x 30 sq. metres and is located cheek by jowl along a flank of the River Kushavati. During the monsoon season, much of it lies submerged under water.

The significance of this locale was realized only in the early 1990s. By then, navvies had begun hacking away at the laterite bed. The timely intervention of the Goa State Dept of Archives & Archaeology averted a major cultural tragedy. Look at the bottom-right in the first photograph below for the damage inflicted.

A serious study of the site awaits inauguration, but preliminary surveys have been done by, among others, the former Director of the Goa State Dept of Archives & Archaeology Dr. P.P. Shirodkar, and researchers at the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa.

Prehistoric rock art gallery in Usgalimol, Goa<br>5D, 24-105L

Prehistoric rock art gallery in Usgalimol, Goa
5D, 24-105L

 
 

The labyrinth symbol has been found all over the world. For more on this topic, click here.

Petroglyph of a labyrinth in Usgalimol, Goa<br>5D, 35L

Petroglyph of a labyrinth in Usgalimol, Goa
5D, 35L

 
Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa<br>5D, 35L

Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa
5D, 35L

 
Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa<br>5D, 35L

Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa
5D, 35L

 
Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa<br>5D, 35L

Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa
5D, 35L

 
Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa<br>5D, 24-105L

Prehistoric rock art in Usgalimol, Goa
5D, 24-105L

 
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  • Ruman Banerjee - June 11, 2013 - 9:58 am

    This is world cultural heritage, gradually fading away from the landscape. In other parts of the world, like the rock art sites of Tanum and Alta (see links)precious engravings such as these get preserved; in India they get vandalized and mutilated. Unless and until we take initiative towards preserving our own cultural heritage, nobody will do it from outside. Nobody does it. Historically, outsiders have only been interested for their own benefits barring a few, like the Pathans, Mughals etc. who really got integrated with the mainland contributing diversity and richness. But we forgot the undercurrent of our own cultural values, ethos, norms and imitated drastically different set of systems without understanding the meaning of it. It was not our brainchild. We copied it from elsewhere. Hence we lacked quality and originality, which this system could have imparted, if got implemented with proper understanding and context. Today, everywhere and by every means in India we are paying for those mistakes in this way.

    http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/352

    http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/557ReplyCancel

  • Arun - October 12, 2009 - 7:41 pm

    Funny how the meaning of the once universal symbol of the “labyrinth” is now obscure.ReplyCancel

  • Mervyn Lobo - October 12, 2009 - 6:54 pm

    The first picture reminds me of petroglyph’s in Ontario. Ones similiar to this picture have been found near running water. The rocks are covered with turf and when a new chief was elected, he was taken to the secret site, the turf removed and he would understand the message carved in.ReplyCancel

    • asmi - September 8, 2014 - 9:32 pm

      I want more information about this..plz any one can help mi on it..plz suggest mi books or article

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