Goa‘s contribution to the world of Indian classical music has been extraordinary. Our traditional strengths and focus have been in vocal music. In the instrumental department, we have produced world-class sarangiyas, violinists, and percussionists in the distant past. Tantuvadyas such as the sitar and sarod have historically not generated much enthusiasm in the Goan musical milieu.

For the past 25 years, Chhote Rahimat Khan, Head of the Sitar faculty at the Kala Academy in Panjim, has been training Goans on the sitar and developing local talent in this area. Chhote hails from Dharwad and grew up in a family of traditional musicians. A brief sketch is available here.

A couple of afternoons ago, I spent an enjoyable hour or so with the ustad in his music room at the Kala Academy. These are images from that session, which included an impromptu recital by Chhote on his beautiful custom-designed Made-in-Miraj sitar.

Chhote Rahimat Khan

Chhote Rahimat Khan
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Chhote Rahimat Khan at Kala Academy in Panjim

Chhote with his custom-designed sitar
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
The ustad in his music room at Kala Academy in Panjim

The ustad in his music room at Kala Academy in Panjim
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
 

I had my Tilt-Shift lens with me and couldn’t resist doing a portrait of Chhote‘s sitar. These are a couple of instances of the Scheimpflug Principle in practice.

 
Chhote's sitar: downward tilt of lens brings the entire plane in focus

Scheimpflug principle: downward tilt of lens brings the frets plane into sharp focus
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
Upward tilt of the lens enables selective focus

Upward tilt of the lens enables selective focus
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
 
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  • Rajan P. Parrikar - July 26, 2011 - 8:03 am

    Arun,

    It is not a major crop – I was fairly close to him. It is not a focus & recompose either, since this image was taken at the lens’ widest aperture of f/2.ReplyCancel

  • Arun - July 26, 2011 - 2:27 am

    Is #3 focus and recompose? Or is it a fairly major crop?ReplyCancel

  • Con Menezes - July 22, 2011 - 9:25 am

    Dear Rajan,

    This is something I never knew about Goa’s contribution in the music field.
    Your photo tips and the details of your lens selection enables me to learn the finer points of photography and utilise them in my own amateur shots.
    Thank you.

    ConReplyCancel

  • [...] the original post here: Chhote Rahimat Khan Posted in General Tags: chhote rahimat khan, chhote-rahimat, classical-music, custom, dharwad, [...]ReplyCancel

  • [...] Go here to see the original: Chhote Rahimat Khan » Photo Blog by Rajan Parrikar [...]ReplyCancel

My father, Motilal Parrikar, completed 90 years a few days back on July 9. He was born in the village of Parra in Goa, in the ward known as Salisvaddo. The house he was born in today lies in ruins (*). Our last name takes after our village, now a paradise lost like the rest of Goa.

(*) Behind the ruins is the ancestral home of Manohar Parrikar, the ex-Chief Minister of Goa and now the Leader of the Opposition.

My father Motilal Parrikar, in Parra near the ruins of the house he was born in

My father Motilal Parrikar, in Parra near the ruins of the house he was born in 90 years ago
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
As a young man...

As a young man...

 
...And today, at 90

...And today, at 90
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Our beautiful village of Parra this July morning

Parra, our beautiful village on this July morning
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
 
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  • Roger D'Souza - July 19, 2011 - 7:51 am

    Dear Rajan,

    Best wished to your dear father as he celebrates his special milestone 90th Birthday.

    May Goa bless him and keep him in happiness top celebrate his 100th.

    Best Wishes,

    RogerReplyCancel

  • roy pacheco - July 19, 2011 - 6:07 am

Disporting through the Goan countryside on a classic monsoon afternoon is one of life’s glorious pleasures. These images were made earlier today.

Lush fields in Dhargal, Goa

Lush fields in Dhargal, Goa
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Master class of green in Porvorim

Master class of green in Porvorim
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
 
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I have been featured in the latest post on the Singh-Ray Blog. Singh-Ray, based in Florida, are makers of some of the finest photographic filters on the market. Click here to read it.

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The Westfjords – Vestfirðir – region is the most affective landscape in all of Iceland, with a power to seize and move the soul like perhaps only the best of Indian classical music can. Towering flat-topped mountains define its fjords and give the area its topographical signature. But such supreme beauty also exacts a price: this remote and sparsely populated corner is burdened by harsh, unforgiving weather. The land here has been steadily emptying out the past 75 years. Geologically the Westfjords are older than the rest of Iceland – glacial fingerprints are everywhere.

Selárdalur is located on the southern shore of sublime Arnarfjörður. In this valley lived Samúel Jónsson (1885-1969), often referred to as an “artist with a child’s heart.” His is said to be a form of naiveté art, and his work survives today near his dwellings which include a church and a house. A restoration project is currently underway at the site.

Selárdalur was also home to another maverick, the hermit Gísli Gíslason (1907-1986), who lived alone on the farm Uppsalir, completely sealed off from all human contact. It is said that when he eventually ‘came back,’ the prolonged isolation had impaired his ability to speak Icelandic.

Selárdalur

Selárdalur: Samúel Jónsson's dwellings
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Midnight sun in Selárdalur

Midnight in Selárdalur
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
Artwork of Samúel Jónsson

Artwork of Samúel Jónsson
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Golden light

Golden light in Selárdalur
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
 
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